NC throwback: Voting under a Confederate flag

Fighting a war that was lost 150 years ago:

“I said ‘I don’t care what they do every other day of the year, but when we vote, that shouldn’t be there’,” Hudson said. “I find it to be very intimidating. To me, it’s saying we really don’t want you coming in here. It is a form of intimidation, any way you look at it. And you know in a sense – it kind of intimidated me.”

Meanwhile, since the June primary, local election officials asked the volunteer firefighter organization to take down the flag for the election this fall. They refused. So the county pursued a second polling location at the Uwharrie Community Building. That didn’t work out either.

Among many other troubling aspects, this issue exposes the hazards of performing a government-sanctioned function (voting) on private property. Not unlike having voting precincts in churches, there can be an element of intimidation, a feeling of “I don’t belong here” from those of a different denomination (or religion) being forced to cross the threshold to exercise their Constitutional right to vote. And in the case of this fire station, it may be privately-owned, but a lot of taxpayer dollars have flowed into it:

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